Loggerheads

1 Church Street
Shrewsbury
SY1 1UG
Telephone(01743) 362398
Real AleQuiet PubSeparate BarDog FriendlyNewspapersSports TVServes LocAleLive Music
Opening times: 11-11 Mon-Sat; 12-11 Sun

Due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic this pub is currently offering additional services:

Please see pub Facebook or website for details of any take-out or delivery services available and any news about future reopening. Updated 19 Jan

Regular beers: Banks's Amber Ale, Jennings Atomic Theory, Marston's 61 Deep, Young's London Gold

See more about this pub on WhatPub, CAMRA's national pub guide.

This 18th-century Grade II listed town-centre pub pub, located in what is said to be the shortest street in the town centre, has a nationally important historic interior. The pub consists of four rooms, all linked by an L-shaped corridor. From the frontage there are two entrances, the right-hand door take you into what is nominally the lounge (spartan by modern standards, it is the largest room, with a bare wooden floor and is the location of the dart-board). The left-hand door takes you into the corridor. First room on the right is what is labelled on the window glass the 'Bar Parlour'. This is a small bar, usually filled with locals, but with the only direct access to the pump-clips on show. Next room up the corridor (on the left) is the 'Smoke Room'. The sign as you enter: 'Gents Only until 1975' is a reminder of a bygone age. The room houses scrubbed tables, high backed settles set into the partition wall, a shove halfpenny board and is dominated by a large fire-place. At the corner of the corridor is a small snug area (the 'Poet's Room'). Although having its own window, surrounding buildings don't allow for much natural light, so the atmosphere is always one where one imagines many clandestine meetings have taken place. This room and the Smoke Room can gain access to the bar via a servery in between the two rooms. Following the corridor round leads you to the toilets and the Lounge, which has its own servery access to the bar. This now has portraits of famous writers on the walls. Unsurprisingly perhaps the pub has since been somewhat of a GBG institution, appearing in 33 of the 43 editions. All in all, a classic pub, until recently the only concession to the 21st century being the TV in the parlour bar (usually in silent mode, naturally). However TV & radio have started to encroach on the lounge, especially on major sporting occasions (eg Rugby). Unspoilt by progress? - you decide. Cheap cask ales on Tuesdays.